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unique attorneys that's done the range of immigration work because i'm passionate i have seen the by his side and what it does it our economy and families and our community and i've seen the incredible force that enterprises bring to revitalize our community and to hire talent from within and aboard. i've seen great entrepreneurship by welcoming talented folks from aboard so reforming the immigration system i hope i'll get a chance to be part of it. and we're looking forward to putting together a team and rolling out the historic reform of that system >> thank you for this conversation. >> thank you to our san francisco chamber of commerce and business forward and sf city for co- hosting this town hall. i'm eager to hear from the other companies about their stories of immigration. tell us your own stories. we're to start with you the ceo of illuminate. >> so my story is not any more special then the stories of what you've heard. you group in india. i gave a shout out and my family really believes in education and the empowerment through education. there is a certain resistlessness and
joined us for a town hall with mayor ed lee with the obama administration on the action on immigration founded here just a few blocks away. that what matters is we have a mare that understands the issues a nearest and dear it to us and that's immigration reform. since it's inception we've gotten over 20 visas alone and the feeling is we have a shortage on green talent when we need to go through the steps we need to go through and for the tech community we're focused on opening up our technical school to the global community. we're in a talent war along with a state war on services gov. and anything we can help to create change here means so much to us. we have the mayor who can creative impact so we stand behind mayor ed lee and we're thrilled he's here. i'm so excited to here what he is has to say. thank you (clapping) >> julia and kevin a thank you for being subpoena great community leaders were we're going to have a robust town meeting this is being live for my radio program. we like to let people know in advance. i'm going to ask a few questions then we're going to open it up to y
through the case of marcello a 37-year-old ecuadorian immigrant who was beaten to death by a group of teenagers on long island in 2008. this is about 25 minutes. >> i feel like i'm in my living room having a conversation. i am really very glad that you were here tonight. i almost didn't make it, but that is another story. as many of you know, my book "hunting season" is about a horrible crime that took place november 8, 2008 in long island when a group of teenagers attacked and killed an immigrant from ecuador. his name was marcello. he wasn't alone that night. he was walking with his friend who survived the attack but marcelo did not. there were many reasons i was a track to the story. one of them was the nature of the crime. i found out very early on that these young people coming and cy were very young. they went to entertainment to go around hunting for beaners which is what they call immigrants. for some of the undocumented immigrants from mexico in the profession they kept talking about how they were looking for illegals from mexico. so, i was horrified by that, of course as
and the what. so the why you can teach them about the immigrant that's picking straubdz. hey, we need immigration reform because we need the education in the u.s. and by the way, those reforms is going to have a - the why then the how. i'm helping march for innovation. it's an online movement that is making it easy to help people to do action. you go on facebook and wherever it's time to take action you can send a tweet to your congress men and women and try to convince your friends to do the same. you sign up and you'll get instructions from the e-mail. i honestly don't know people in north american. i promise - back in the day when the law - by the way, who remembers what soap is. many websites replaced the website with some kind of black and white frame. we feel we really have a model of activity we should - i'm going to tell everybody that 1, 2, and 3 to support the immigration reform. we're going to have access or the chances of services like voices 1, 2, and 3 is going to be much lower. i want to see the business owners follow suit. by the way, my wife and daughter are here and
an umbrella. i'm a woman. i'm an immigrant. i am hispanic. i don't qualify for aarp membership yet. and i am a republican. i am an endangered species right sadly now. , i often get asked how can you possibly be a republican? why are you a republican? the explanation lies in my personal history. my family story shapes my views. i came here in 1980. i was born in nicaragua. there was a communist revolution. the sandinistas came to power in 1979 after a three-year bloody civil war. it turned out the sandinistas were also communists. they quickly went about creating communism in our little country. my parents were not fans of repression or censorship or redistribution of wealth at that point they made the decision of getting out of nicaragua. my father stayed behind and became a contra, a nicaraguan freedom fighter. when your father is struggling to bring freedom back to your country, you realize at an early age that politics matters. election results matter. being a bystander is not an option. being involved is what you must do. i became a republican the night i heard ronald reagan addressing t
and immigration reform. both of those are true, but we made a lot of progress. we would like to get both of those passed as soon as possible. in the end whether that happens in 2013 or 2014 would be better for everyone involved if it happens sooner rather than later. let's get it done and we made a lot of progress on the issues and continue to push it as long as it takes through the rest of the presidency. we are not looking at progress on perhaps the same calendar. >> fair enough. i'm going to leave it there. the communications director for the white house, thanks for coming out to the north lawn. i know it's chilly. >> a little chilly. >> more first read next. it is the season for the last minute senate retirements. we will tell you about some of them. the holidays make everyone take stock in their lives. it's no different. who will be the year's unexpected retirement. we are making a list and checking it twice. always fun for the campaign junkies. we will have the latest on the deadly derailment in new york city. they have the black box and are starting to piece together what happened. we will
to pass a budget. they need to do something about immigration. need to have a raise for people on social security so need to have a raise for people on social security so they can live in dignity for their last couple of years in life. host: with just two weeks to go do think there is to do that? doler: all they're going to talking about obamacare until it starts working. host: yesterday on abc this week , republican congressman tom cole came in to talk about congress is to do list. guest: we stumbled into one before that i don't think is wise and didn't occur. the line i usually use is, around every cat walk and chew gum. let's just to come for a while. right now chewing gum is getting a budget deal and make sure we don't default on the debt ceiling comes around. tom cole, republican of oklahoma talking about the to do we are alsoress. getting your thoughts on this congress on track to be the least productive congress. charles is up next on our line for democrats from raleigh, north carolina. i agree with the last caller. all this was to stop obama from being a good president. republica
met with activists on a hunger strike for immigration reform. house republicans can get this done. or they could work to prevent 1.3 million people from losing unemployment benefits in january. or how about increasing the minimum wage? the top 1% earned more than 20% of the nation's income last year. the biggest share in decades. and yet the federal minimum wage is still stuck at $7.25 an hour. it hasn't been raised since 2009. if the minimum wage had had kept pace with the earnings of the top 1% since 1960, it would be over $22 today. it's time to get serious. even if this republican congress won't. joining me now are jared bernstein and krystal ball. thank you both for coming on the show. >> thanks for having us, rev. >> thank you. >> krystal, so much work to do but this dprs is on track to be the least productive ever. >> well, that's exactly right. and i think they're leaving because they don't care to get anything done. they want to keep flogging negative obama care stories and hope that scores them some political points. but the truth of the matter is they could put immigrat
of our happiness but of the many families that can be torn apart by our broken immigration system. mr. doggett: we gave thought to those who were gathered at that very moment here on the national mall going without food, fasting for justice and they've been doing that now for weeks. thanksgiving is about the first immigrants in this land, in this land of opportunity, but today we find too many of our neighbors are denied opportunity because of their immigration status. they can't board a plane, they can't come out of the shadows. they don't know when they go to work in the morning if they'll find their family members there at night. this is not right and the time to fix that is right now. the only thing preventing a bipartisan response to the immigration problems we have in this country is the unwillingness of the speaker to permit a bipartisan vote on reform legislation. and to those who are not moved by their heart, they should be moved by their pocketbook, because the economic potential of permitting these individuals , 2/3 of which in mexican families in texas without documents ha
cheerleaders. that, sadly, is what happened. >> are you disappointed on another debate on immigration, that it appears that republicans in this case don't see a pathway any longer toward getting this done? >> immigration would be one of those issues that shows that those who try to pigeonhole bishop's pastor's catholics are wrong. on health care we might be upset with the democrats, the administration. on immigration we're saying to the house of representatives, which is dominated by the republicans, you guys got to get your act together. this is the best chance we've had in fair and just immigration reform. it's in your lap and doesn't seem to be going anywhere, and we're not going to let you off the hook. so yeah, we're disappointed there as well. >> let me touch on gay marriage. this week illinois is becoming the 16th state, including d.c., to allow same-sex marriage. do you think this is evolving in such a way that ultimately it will be legal everywhere, or is it the opposite, that there will be a backlash and the status quo will be maintained? >> i would be a pollyanna that there
, but they could be immigrants, seniors, homeless, people, with disabilities, and people who may be don't want to go through the hassle factor of accessing cal fresh and the people who remoteness, and would have been a part of the city where they will have to transfer from one bus line to another bus line to get to the office. >> the people who are unaware of the fact that over 500 new applicants a month are applying on-line, using my benefits cal wynn on-line portal that we introduced here in san francisco. about four years ago. and so there is a lot of ways that people can access cal fresh now and they can go to the office and they can apply on-line, and they can work with the partners at the san francisco food bank who has a monthly cal at ther on the website of different places around san francisco, where the people are going, but really what we are looking at at the department of human services, this winter is taking a fairly deep dive into our current caseload, and saying, which people are getting medical and getting healthcare benefits that are not accessing cal fresh but have income l
hungry. and as an immigrant coming into this country, i was, you know, i had this image that there would be no hunger and this country because, you know, it is the wealthiest country in the world. and it is, ironic that in the wealthiest country in the world and one of the wealthiest cities in the world, san francisco, that there are people, children, families, seniors, who every day, go to bed hungry. and i think that it is really sad, that that is the reality it, for so many people in san francisco. that is why i think that this hearing is so important. and you know, it is around the time of the holidays that perhaps some of these issues have more resonance for folks. but i think that this is really important, we picked up the examiner today and the front page of the examiner today was housing cost and rents and those top concerns for san franciscans and you know that there is a sense of people are being displaced. but, i think that we are forgetting that even basic things like putting the food on the table is something that many people are not able to do. and so, i think that we have
similar to the nazis whose members mainly target immigrants upon receiving such orders. the topography sucks. that so far. it is located in a special day dana. despite the religious attacks and immigrants who condones popularity has seen a surge in recent polls amid rising illegal immigration from the middle east europe spring. if greece were to hold elections golden dawn could potentially come as the third largest party in parliament . three militants killed by israeli security forces last week belonged to an al qa'ida linked terror group in which a team spirit council has said on its website. new claims raise concerns in the west bank of rising jihadist activity which has already been established in the gaza strip for more than a decade. the organizations said in a statement. we announced to the nation to its late nights with the grace of going beyond the only team to play for has attained a foothold in the west bank of everyone had tried to report every six months. israeli security agency shin bet did not specify feel that it's killed what else they demand this quilt in a statement
positive. immigration. it is a positive moment for you -- i think. it is a positive moment for you. >> that is a pretty short list. >> this was really positive. you talk about being positive on something like immigration reform. i am not saying that pathway to citizenship or pathway to legalization, but you just talked about the need for our party to be compassionate. we needed to be compassionate and you got absolutely killed for saying that. i will even go a step further. mitt romney decided that he needed to lurch his four-one extremist and it ended up killing us. how do we win that hardware, not only at the governor's mansion but also in debate like that? how do we as a party do more of a positive message? >> i think you are right, joe and mary will agree with this as well. historically, republicans have talked with their mind. we like to dump all the statistics out there. we are the number one state for job creation or the number one this for that. we pitch all of these cold and sterile facts out. what maybe a better way to message this is that being the number one job creatin
of minimum wage, the issue of jobs. you know, we still have -- >> overall economy, immigration. >> exactly right. but trust me, it's just going to be all about health care, health care, health care. and that's really a shame of the and then just one other point -- >> and those people we should say who are out there in various congressional districts, obviously particularly the tough congressional districts, there's nothing they can do about it. >> there's nothing they can do about it, but another point i wanted to make is i've been critical of president obama on a number of issues. but however anybody feels about obama care, it is the law of the land and it really bothers me that the republican party really wants this thing to fail. and i just don't think it's in anyone's interests for this whole thing to collapse in a heap. that's really a shame. >> interesting over the weekend, e.j., cardinal dolan was on "meet the press" and he said catholic bishops have been huge supporters of universal health care but obviously they didn't agree with the mandates for hospitals to cover birth control.
from food to raise awareness of the need for a bipartisan remedy for our broken immigration -- immigration system. support for the fasters is growing. like many in the united states -- in the u.s. they want to find a solution for immigrant families living in this great country that they call home. we can all agree it's time to modernize our immigration laws. fixing what is broken will not be an easy task but it will bring benefits to our nation which can be strengthened and reinvigorated by those hardworking individuals. i encourage my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to reach across one another, begin a conversation and resolve this issue. we can work together to secure our bordered and honor the rule of law while addressing the problems in our immigration system with solutions that reflect our american principles. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and
before the attack on marcelo, they attacked another immigrant who was a naturalized u.s. citizen from columbia who have been here for more than 30 years, hector. he was working in a restaurant and was walking home and they attacked him. he ran to a house called the lights went on and he was saved. they went on and be found and killed the lucero. no one asked him where are you from, what language do you speak. it was just based on appearance. it's a very, very complicated thing and very scary issue. but i think i'm going to stop. i am all talked out. thank you so much and we can keep this conversation going. thanks so much for being here. [applause] >>> here's a look at some of the best-selling nonfiction books according to "the wall street journal." this reflects sales as of november 17. >>> the author you may not have heard of but you might have seen his work is kevin kallaugher, the editorial cartoonist for the economist. how did you come up with the idea of putting all of your work into a book? >> this year celebrated my 35th year with the economist magazine. i thought this would b
engaged in a hunger strike on the national mall in pursuit of comprehensive immigration reform. a day later, it was a nod to the economy. the president promoting small business saturday by gift shopping at a local washington bookstore with the first daughters. and maybe it's the holiday season, but in an interview with abc's barbara walters on friday night, the president was downright optimistic, despite the fact -- despite facing the grinch-like poll numbers of his presidency. saying, quote, the good thing when you're down is usually you've got nowhere to go but up. let's get right to our panel here in new york, msnbc political analyst, jonathan alder, and in washington, msnbc analyst and former rnc chairman, michael steele. and who is never grinchly, michael steele. >> no, never. >> in the spirit of the holiday season, i would like you to tell us, as we're 11 or 12 days before the next recess, what have the republican members of congress, other than throwing a lot of shade at healthcare.gov, what have they fliaccomplished 2013? >> not a lot. that's obvious. this congress has done ve
with a couple of sisters and my great-grandfather was german immigrants a and ohio state's 1926 even back then to be overwhelmed of the corporation's. and also one more thing, my father was part of that cycle of american history of the conservative serious locally every 30 years so he picked up the historical academic structures from my grandpa. >> they're all from the midwest so there was the therapy they brought to the east. debt was genetic civic given the current political climate but in the postwar years a strong conservative current of mccarthy of ohio. because they were witness there was the entirely different climate it did 15 seconds i will give a very remote part of south dakota that build a hydroelectric dam in the middle of nowhere at a store their expensive paid very good wages and change the lives of everybody who went through their. now coming back as doctors and engineers. of those courageous with the importance to get out and touch and feel what of those accounts that arthur gives it his accounts and was the side of the south. in the old lady it to be called to the egghea
benefits to immigrants is wise and welcome. what lessons has my right hon. friend learned from the failures of the last labour government who, despite claiming that just 13,000 polish immigrants would arrive in the uk, deliberately allowed more than 1 million to come into our country? >> my hon. friend raises an important point. of course, there are benefits of free movement within the eu, but there should be proper transition controls. we increased the transition controls on bulgaria and romania from five years to seven years when we became the government, but it still absolutely baffles me why the last labour government decided in 2004 to have no transitional controls at all. they predicted 14,000 polish people would arrive to work in britain -- in the event, the number was over 700,000. it was a shameful dereliction of duty. >> the prime minister will be aware that the mayor of london, boris johnson, proposes to close nearly every single ticket office on the london underground network, with more than 700 jobs being lost. does the prime minister believe that that is the way to raise livin
because it's excluding the undocumented immigrant and it's excluding the unborn baby, so we begin to bristle at that. and secondly we said, and wait a minute, we who are pretty -- we catholics who are kind of among the pros when it comes to providing health care do it because of our religious conviction and because of the dictates of our conscience and now we're being asked to violate some of those. so that's when we began to worry and drawback and say mr. president, please, you're really kind of -- you're really kind of pushing aside some of your greatest supporters here. >> congressman, as a catholic do you agree with that? the cardinal went on to say they have been on the front end of this, i think he threw out 1919, trying to get our government to take up what it means to have health care in this country. but do you think that catholic supporters are going to hear the cardinal there and say, you know what, maybe i don't think so highly of obama care. >> i just hope that all supporters of all faiths listen to the pope. i think he's the most terrific voice that i've heard in my
group of immigrants. the irish. when frank quinn grew up here there were a few italian families, a few scots but the rest of the people were irish. salons served irish whisky. >> all the irish families are gone and moved some where else. >> absolutely. >> reporter: when he was a child getting a catholic education and the roaring -- everyone seems to have a job and the stock market was creating a whole new class of millionaires. these were the days of prohibition. that 13 year period when a constitutional amendment made alcoholic drinks illegal. of course the law was widely ignored. perhaps nowhere as openly as in the mission district. frank quinn remembers when someone asked his uncle where he could get a drink in the neighborhood. >> my uncle said to him. do you know where the funeral parlor is down in the block. he said yes, he said well that's the only place here where you can't get a drink. >> reporter: we looked at a building that was once a speak easy or as it was called a blind pig. >> if you wanted to get into one of these places they were illegal. how did you get in? >> you wo
breaking a parisian code, wasn't it? instead of pretending these immigrants were not there, you're actually inspired by their colors, their hair, their clothes, and you turn them into your collection. >> definitely. i was very inspired by different people always. maybe -- with me, i felt a little different. a project at school. for example, not doing football. i was more touched by people that are a little different or could be rejected. they inspire me also because i do not know it was another world. for inspiration, for example, because close very clearly, very early became my attraction -- clothes became nmy attraction, a subsection. as more attractive to addressing people than addressing myself. it was not my objective desire, my own person. so i think that if i looked, the market inspire me. people different in it the streets or inspiring me. not what was fashion. maybe i was a finding something to were very inspiring. laurant. i like the ones that are different and have their own style. i like the ones that are different. they have style. i love them. so everyone that was different, i
from asian caucus that have done work to support immigration reform. we have so many young people that came to the i see at a young age from a convolute process don't have the same access because of their jobs in the country. they've been courageus about how they can access higher education. and i want to recognize hospitality house jamming i didn't changing is our executive director. when people ask me how we're addressing homelessness in the center it's by hospitality house. one that people go to and they have an arts center. by supporting those organizations it's going to be a wonderful partnership. and seeing people how to golf is a wonderful wonderful thing thank you. again and i want to present this accomodation on the part of the board of supervisors to the d g in our start up incubator where you're beginning our start up we what to thank you for this opportunity for the ribbon cutting (clapping.) thank you very much >> thank you and welcome again. >> thank you (clapping.) thank you very much. okay. now moving on i'd like to ask an important guest to come to the stage h
's the incural culture or better immigration whether it's capital willing to invest and still enough of a production, you know, platform that if we're smart in this post recession environment we'll won't go back to the economy we'll move forward. i'm bullish about this and this region is rich in small batch and boutique on up to advanced >> technology will have a role in all of that as well. if you see this company 3-d technology for example, willing regulation in his the way we looked engineering systems because you could see it. auto desk is growing rapidly in san francisco they just opened up another portion of their work on pier 9. we're all talking about advanced manufacturing >> no longer have the machines but the machines are operating with an ipad and your reading out precision cutting everybody from chocolates to clothing to manufactured products so extension is going to play a big thing in manufacturing. >> if you're joining us think on the radio we're talking about economic growth and we have ed lee mayor of san francisco and the bruce cats from the washington area. let
, and wendy as well. james from senior disability and peter from the immigrant legal resource center, nancy cross, don nunly from the aims project, coline from the cap pain for a better nutrition and mopsy from the center of health and uc beckerry public health >> next speaker? >> good morning, my name is alex and i am a senior disability action. and even though there are meal sites and home delivered meals for seniors and people with disabilities that demand that such meals as stated in the funding can provide. and in 2006, the cap between the number of meals served and the number needed was between 6 and 9 million needs. annually. and the last three years, the budget for the home delivered meals has been cut and what needs to happen is that the money needs to be increased. and there is a long waiting list and it has to be paid with young people with disabilities and they tend to fall through the cracks, on the list of needs food is on top along with housing more money for food. >> thank you. >> next speaker. >> with reference to the sros one of the things ha they are asking for is that th
for immigration. am i wrong? >> the next time i do this showing i'm bringing a couple hundred bills to show you. >> on the still his, the economic is in fact growing, jobs are being added. this republican party is a lot different than the one you ran, speaker gingrich. republicans back then were actually bringing why is to the table. >> let's do everything we can do derail them. >> my friend here, you guys tortured him, tried to demonize him every day, every second, so don't fall for that. >> i was in high school. >> not you. >> presidents can recover. usually if they get in deep trouble, they recovered by getting a new team. your former boss, mr. gibbs, who just had a great weekend in the auburn victory. he said something very clear today about what ought to be happening. i think we should -- >> i do think it will be inexplicable if somebody involved in the creation of the website doesn't get fired. >> so, you know the team. if you were there right now, who would you recommend gets spared? >> well, the way you phrase that question -- [ laughter ] >> i'm making the serious point, this is a -- b
bleeding over to immigration or into the iran talks to other policy areas it is looking to move ahead on in the next couple of months and years? guest: on immigration, the encouraging the congress to take up immigration, pass it, it just begins to sound like the same thing. when you have a weaker president, you are much less inclined to support what he is asking you to do. the white house position has oh is been the republicans have to see it as in their own best interest to make things right with a growing hispanic electorate, that they did very poorly the it -- poorly with in the last election. on iran, it is even more pressing. what the president is asking for now is six months to get a real agreement with iran to reduce its capacity to enrich iranian. center forw to the american progress where we have epa administrator gina mccarthy talking about climate change. ahead of her trip to china next week. u.s.-chinae that cooperation on the environment is critical to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, carbon pollution, for our country and the world. we are particularly excited to have h
the congress does last until 2014. there is still a possibility of immigration reform. but right now, december 2013, tamron, this congress doesn't have anything to show for it other than resolving a government shutdown that lasted 16 days to be able to extend the nation's borrowing limit to just a couple of months. outside of that it doesn't have much to show for it. all of the work getting done, this congress really hasn't been able to tie its shoe laces. >> looking forward to the next year, it seems it's dreadful in that we're not seeing a change in tone of particularly from republicans on some of the things that many people thought we would see, particularly immigration reform. >> that's right, tamron, the one thing we'll look for is that change is possible. the tone that you have right now can be very different two months later. there are all of these events and circumstances that can change things. there are people hoping as bad as 2013 has been for all of the political players, 2014 is a better year. >> let's hope so. thank you very much. we appreciate it, mark. >> now to colorado where
why this administration has con so much to stop arrests and deportations for illegal immigrants but is actively trying to deport this family. >> the fact that we have room for 12 million and not room for one family tells you there's something amiss about this administration. >> pie the way, bret, this family could lose custody of their children if forced to go back to germany and they don't go to school there. >> all along they have argued this family doesn't qualify, they're not part of a recognized social group that should be given asylum and that's how we've ended up at the supreme court. and when their family attorney that we talked to there filed with the supreme court, the administration took the step of deciding not to file any type of response. so just days before the justices were scheduled to vote on whether or not to take up this case, the supreme court ordered this administration to file a response, explaining the government's position on why this family should be deported. that response is due december 19th. so if the schedule holds we could know in the next few wee
to the bad old days i meant that you to kill me to do it. the son of a russian immigrant happened to be seated by me at dinner this summer when i went to dinner with a bunch of our friends. he looked at me as that, did you like yeltsin? he said it just like that. yeah, i did. he got a big smile and said good. my country and its entire history is only produced to true democrats. alexander kareem key and then in linden got rid of kerensky and you've help yeltsin stay. too bad we lost it again, that maybe we can get it back. incredible conversation. suresh of us going broke like crazy at the end of the civil war. the first thing i did was to go to vancouver and put together a $24 billion package so we could bring soldiers home from other countries. principally the politics states. we were talking about this before. the american people were 74% against russia. what is bill clinton going to canada to meet with the russian leader? we've got economic problems at home. and i also knew i needed his cooperation to keep from coming up the works in bosnia because of the historic ties of the r
are hurt he wants to seal the border is ninety nine percent of the refugees are illegal immigrants. we insist border protection the wooden planks and everyone who is illegally entered the area be expelled. the small village of goalie on to vent sits close to where the fence is being constructed the villages here see no need for it. mike and i came on the end andhat god began to go to these people i need eat and trying to save themselves the afternoon trouble and we defeated them i keep them watered and a slice of rats. some have the fortitude to see that it's built into the system isn't too thin. absolute nonsense absolute sense to me is the greek people to come here was coming up. they have no cause any problems at all he in tow. unhcr is also opposed to the fence the procedures of people applying. and the supreme court to decide whether the person that buys qualifies for the students are not. but people cannot access and therefore we don't pay for anything to prevent people from crossing the border of any part of the border. this fence is beginning to reflect the growing divide withi
immigration to civil lib we can at this. the top pick is bill brackton. most recently he has been with the los angeles police department. if he picked, braton would take over for ray kelley. under his leadership, the crime dropped but the nypd has been accuse did of excessive surveillance and targetingmul muslim. stop and frisk became a popular tactic for officers. we discussed it with faisel patel and john j college of criminal law. i askedfaiza why the new york city commissioner job is so important. >> important. >> it is the largest police department in the country. as new york goes, a lot of people are looking to see how it's conducting policing, what kind of tact i can it's using. >> maybe a man named bill braton who used to be the commissioner in new york, currently in los angeles. do you think it's a good move? >> i think that the new police commissioner has to do an important thing, rebuild relations with minority communities in the city. we have seen a drop decline. many credit bill braton from his first term when he used to be police commissioner for having put in place the systems t
the comprehensive immigration bill. >> what about iran. president rouhani gave an interview over the weekend basically saying iran has it right and will have the right to enrich uranium. he's pocketing that as something achieved from the negotiations not something decided in the final agreement six months from now. what about congress pushing -- certainly in the senate pushed by menendez, council on foreign relations impose sanctions or at least the threat of sanctions. where do you stand on that? the president is fight it tooth and nail. >> yes, andrea. two things. first of all, you know the expression right tonight rich is not in the agreement. it says you have to have a neutraly agreeable program. i think both would agree right to free speech dnd on being able to veto anything he said, you would not think that was a right to free speech. with respect to additional sanctions, we should be very careful. we need to tread very carefully here. the reason iran is at the table, the reason engaged in serious discussions, international community behind these sanctions have been effective. if partn
i would say is we've seen evangelicals move on number of issues, including immigration reform. if you encroach on family time, you have a potential partner in the religious right who want to see people treated fairly and people able to spend time with their family. >> when you look at the minimum wage which we covered repeatedly and members of congress talking about and president is proposed an increase there, you're talking about the rules of the road that always defined the limits. we asked corporations to make as much money as possible and find them to be efficient when they do that. they have a duty to do that. we have never said that means they can hire, for example, children and have 8-year-olds working in factories, there are countries that allow that. when you look at the people you're talking to, they are part of that long tradition and as private sector unions decline in scale and size, those folks don't have the leadership necessarily that we associate with another era which many people argue makes them even braver. it's important to do that at the state and local l
-american and latino communities. if you're not willing to deal with the issues of immigration, of affirmative action, of reform of our housing markets, then you're not really serious about the issues of race in america. >> well, what i find interesting politically about the republicans here is they don't have any point person that is going to get a lot of media attention, and focus on minority outreach. and research and clarification. they don't have a go-to person on this, which tells me that certainly they're not genuine about it at all. now, in may 2013 survey done by the pew research center found that 88% of african-americans and 57% of whites felt that there is at least some discrimination towards african-americans. are things getting better, or are they getting worse, zerlina? >> i don't think they're getting better. i wouldn't say that we are where we were in 1955. of course that's not true. but i think there are a number of different things. as michael pointed out, there are pervasive problems that exist in our society. you know, outcomes are not equal for people of color. when you are born,
issue from bleeding over to immigration or into the iran talks to other policy areas it is looking to move ahead on in the next couple of months and years? immigration, the encouraging the congress to take it, it juston, pass begins to sound like the same thing. when you have a weaker president, you are much less inclined to support what he is asking you to do. the white house position has oh is been the republicans have to see it as in their own best interest to make things right with a growing hispanic electorate, that they did very poorly the it -- poorly with in the last election. on iran, it is even more pressing. what the president is asking for to get a realths agreement with iran to reduce its capacity to enrich iranian. the credibility problem is not so much right now, although he is facing questions about it with congress in particular. in six months right now, what really concerns supporters of the president, what he -- would he be willing if iran has not agreed to dismantle the program, to end this process and reimpose sanctions to take a step toward more footing with i
it will be -- there will be viciousness. >> i know. any bill passed. >> any bill passed. >> immigration, remember they were going to talk about immigrati immigration? >> such an important bill and a bill business would love to see passed. >> there can be so much anger down there. >> infrastructure spending. so many things we need to deal with, gridlock is not necessarily a good thing. >> true. and remember, i'm just saying gridlock, the conclusion is it is playing a role. same time, i don't know why anyone doesn't think it's the worst of -- the worst of the fights. we are so close to 2014. >> big board, by the way, brazilian metals and mining company with the investor day at the nyse and nasdaq, online jewelry retailer blue nile with cyber monday. talking to the company ceo later in the show. >> my trust owns this. a disappointment. this is a company that has been doing everything it can to try to cut back expenses. very small capital expenditure budget this year. it's in brazil and brazil has been a horrendous market. brazil is probably the most challenged of the bricks. and that's saying something because russia is in
income neighborhoods or may potentially think about immigrant communities as well. how do you create services, create those services and then promote and communicate those services and a way that's linguistically and culturally relevant to these committees as well. >> one of the issues you been working on at national to get cities is the issue best races which is how the business licensing regulations get in the way and how do they constrain microenterprises? you been doing with the issue of food trucks. and you talk about the work you've been doing and maybe give us ideas of places, of cities where there's a lot of interesting work going on and you're making progress and maybe what some of the challenges have been? >> sure. i think you raise a lot of interesting points and i would agree with most of those. when we think about licensing, particularly at the city levels and permits, there's always a reason why a particular permit or license was there to begin with but over time as we said, unless you actually taken in the door, take stock, think about why those licenses and permits ar
, a history of immigrant. a history of people who come to this country seeking a better life and making it so. it isn't just those individuals who make the headlines or become elected officials, it's also those who toil for years who lived in the working class neighborhoods of san francisco who helped us because history will teach us this. filipino community helped us build the golden gate bridge and when we looking that it's not just the named engineers whether it's the rail yards or the bridges are simply built by names their built by the hands of immigrants to make the city successful. and because of that history and because it's reflected in so much of the city. when i look at selma south of market and the "x" sorrow arena and understand where the filipino people are living you'll see street names that reflect the filipino national heroes. peoplely often excuse me. what is this street name mean resolve who's that? or other names? there are those streets that reflect our history. and we have some special historic figures like victor who was a filipino oiven so we named a park after her.
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